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Serving Customers with Mental Illness with Dignity


Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity at Work

What is the first thought that comes to your minmental healthd when you hear the term “mental illness”? You probably think about a commercial which is promoting mental health or a person you may know who is struggling with an illness. Alternatively, we may be speaking about you. What we often forget is that people with mental illness come to our organizations and businesses looking for goods and services. For some, their disorder will not impede their interactions. However, for others, they may experience barriers which prevent them from initiating or completing a transaction with you.

These individuals whose symptoms are more visible may require a heightened level of sensitivity and patience as well as an out-of-the-box type of service. According to the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health in Canada (CAMH), mental illness is the leading cause of disability

 

The Life and Economic Impact of Major Mental Illnesses in Canada: 2011-2041. Prepared for the Mental Health Commission of Canada, they indicate 1 in 5 Canadians experiences a mental health or addiction problem. By the time Canadians reach 40 years of age, 1 in 2 is the number.

The alarming statistics indicate this is a large demographic –one that requires our attention to ensure we provide an excellent customer service experience, get their repeat business and generate customer loyalty.

Learn more about serving customers with mental illness is our issue of Your Diverse Customer Training Ezine.  The topics include:

  • What is mental illness?
  • Tips for conveying and receiving information.
  • Interview:  How to conduct how visits.
  • Template:  Customer assistance form. A tool for providing service for unpredictable customers.
  • De-escalation – Tips for avoiding potentially violent situations.
  • Application and Resources – Case Study, link to further videos and learning

Purchase your Pdf copy today!

Your Diverse Customer – Serving Customers with Mental Illness

$20.00

 

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Millennial-Friendly Businesses Which Attract, Sustain and Grow Businesses


 

If you own a business or youfall 2018 -millennials - cover manage an agency, you will most definitely have Millennials serving your customers /clients. Traditional forms of training are ineffective. Written text is not the way to go! With the multitude of media these days, Millennials expect the training to be engaging, visually-pleasing, authentic and timely.

Remember, they are tech-savvy and lovers of visuals. They value authenticity and timeliness. Corporations like McDonald’s and Avon Canada are catering to this new group of entrepreneurs and workers. By providing online training and scheduling, most of the education process can actually take place in the comfort of the Millennial’s home.

Psychology Professor Christy Price from Dalton State University research concluded, there were 5 R’s to keep in mind.

  1. Research-based methods should be used along with collaboration and no lecturing.
  2. Relevant – information must be timely.
  3. Rationale – they need to know the reason behind the way things are done.
  4. Relaxed – They like laid back sessions with warm and empathetic trainers.
  5. Rapport – They prefer instructors who take a personal interest in them.

 

To learn more about how to serve, market and train millennials for an excellent customer service experience, purchase this issue of our new training magazine, Your Diverse Customer.

The topics in this issue include:

  • Why is the Millennial market so important?
  • What do Millennials expect when it comes from customer service?
  • Motivating Millennial Employees
  • 5 Different Kinds of Millennials
  • Resources
  • Website Checklist: Is Yours Millennial-Friendly

 

Your Diverse Customer – Millennial Issue

Pdf version of an eZine

$20.00

 

Great Customer Service Begins with Knowing How to Work with Language Barriers


coverEvelina Silveira, President, Diversity at Work

Customer service is about communication. A fruitful experience will result in both customer and agent satisfaction. Customer service training implies both the agent and the customer comprehend English, but that is not always the case.

According to Statistics Canada 2016, 2% of the Canadian population cannot speak English or French. The percentage is likely to soar, especially with recent news of mass migration and immigration proposed by the federal government.

Conditional on where you live, or the service you may provide, the percentage of people who lack English proficiency skills may be more substantial. Consider if you are a non-profit agency which delivers employment services to newcomers, or a store located in the heart of an ethnic community? All of these variations may result in a greater need for competencies in working with customer and clients who have language barriers.

While the encounter will be more challenging, it is not unmanageable. You can still provide courteous, attentive and results-oriented customer service. “Going-the-extra-mile” can contribute to customer loyalty; increased brand identification within a community; word-of-mouth advertising; but most of all, the satisfaction of providing them with what they want.

The various strategies and tips we will explore in this issue can be easily adapted to serving customers with learning and cognitive delays. Why? Patience, clear communication, and a willingness to “think-out-side-the-box” are requirements for reaching people with barriers.

In this issue of  Your Diverse Customer Training Ezine, you will learn how to communicate with people who have language barriers.

The contents of this issue include:

  • how to tell the difference between a strong accent and a language barrier
  • guide to reading letters and numbers over the telephone
  • common idioms to avoid
  • 8 Rules for Better Understanding
  • How to Make Your Communication Clearer
  • Case Study
  • Links to Training Resources

 

Purchase your Pdf version here:

Your Diverse Customer -Serving Customers With Language Barriers

$20.00

The Value of the Senior Citizen Market


Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity at Work

seniorscoverThe proportion of senior citizens (aged 65 and over) in Canada has been increasing over the past 40 years, and this group is becoming a larger segment of our population. According to Stats Canada, the proportion of seniors grew to 14% in 2010.

By 2036, seniors are expected to comprise 25% of our population.

It makes sense, then, that your organization or business should take an inventory to see how well-prepared you are to serve this growing population. You want to maximize your opportunities for sales; you want to provide effective and empathetic service; you need to meet legislative requirements regarding human rights and disabilities. It’s important to note that today’s seniors no longer fit bygone stereotypes. Boomer seniors won’t be cranky, sick, frail, and living in old-age homes as we once knew them. Current seniors are outliving previous generations by being health-conscious and active.

Stats Canada reports here, “The census counted 127,925 seniors (2.6% of the senior population) living in senior residences (72% women; 28% men). The majority (84%) housed in senior residences lived without a spouse/partner. For seniors aged 65-74 in senior residences, 81% were single men and 82% were single women.”

These stats reveal that only a very small percentage of seniors live by themselves, which is due to improved health, more support services, and adaptive devices. These factors contribute to seniors’ independence, improved quality of life, and more opportunities for engagement with others.

All of this information shows that we’re seeing a new profile of an evolving demographic. Today’s seniors don’t conform to our outdated ideas of a senior population. As a result, your business or organization needs to consider the way you and your staff view your senior clients and customers. You need to explore how you can improve the experience of seniors who frequent your organization or business.

This issue of Your Diverse Customer (our training ezine) will inform you and your staff on what you can do to improve the experience of seniors who count among your clients or customers.

Topics included:

  • Making your business or service “Senior-Centric”
  • The New Baby Boomer and How to Market to Them
  • Age-Friendly Business Checklist
  • Training resources – videos and links

Order a copy of our TRAINING Ezine today!

Our ezine offers you the tools to enhance your business operations by increasing your awareness of customer demographics; while learning how to provide excellent service with our training tips and resources.

Use the eZine for onboarding activities, departmental meetings as well as part of your customer service training.

Your Diverse Customer – Focus on Older Adults

A training eZine.

$20.00

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