How to Maximize Your Workplace Diversity: Conduct a Workforce Composition Survey


Introducing the Diversity at Work, Do-It-Yourself Workforce

Composition Survey Toolkit!

 

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You would like to know more about your workforce, but you don’t know where to begin.

You’re intimidated by the process.

How do you make sure you ask the right questions?

How can you do this without hiring an expensive consultant?

If you have a skilled human resources team and a secure database — our D-I-Y Workplace Composition Survey Toolkit is for you.

The results will help you to determine:

If your workforce represents the community and clients you serve?

Are you meeting your Employment Equity goals?

Are you fully utilizing the education and training of your workforce?

Do your existing benefit and reward plans fit your current demographics?

What percentage of your workforce will be retiring soon?

Is your workforce representative of the community you work in?

Are you meeting your Employment Equity goals?

Are you fully utilizing the talents of your workforce?

And much more.

Testimonial from user:

“When we first started discussing a Diversity Survey, we didn’t know where to begin with questions and themes, let alone how to ensure the questions we were asking and the message we were delivering was politically correct and relevant to our employees. Evelina and Diversity at Work solved this problem for us by providing a Diversity Survey template, which we were able to modify based on our targeted outcome. This template saved us a tremendous amount of time and money, and also assured us that the survey content was respectful and aligned with our Shared Values.”

Tahlia Rimnyak, CHRP | Human Relations Coordinator
McCormick Canada

For more information and to purchase please visit:

http://www.yourdiversityatwork.com/classes/diyWorkForceSurvey.php

 

 

 

 

 

The Guide to Workplace Inclusion


Preview and Purchase at www.yourdiversityatwork.com/ebook/

Read  below what others have said about our book:

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ENDORSEMENTS:

This is an important and timely book for those who want more inclusive workplaces. It moves seamlessly from concepts and terminology and translates them into practical and actionable ideas. All readers, no matter where they are on their diversity and inclusive journey, will find something valuable in this book. Evelina Silveira and Jill Walters have created an impressive resource that includes examples of promising practices from across the globe. This should be every HR professional’s companion!

~Ratna Omidvar, executive director, Global Diversity Exchange, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

The No-Nonsense Guide to Workplace Inclusion provides a thorough and engaging roadmap of the journey toward organizational inclusion. The authors write from a position of rich, credible experience, with the result that this Guide can help companies capitalize on opportunities and skirt problems on the road to fuller inclusion of an increasingly diverse workplace. Filled with examples and evidence-based solutions, this Guide is a valuable tool for any organization working on building and strengthening its culture of inclusiveness.

~Alison Konrad, PhD, professor of organizational behaviour, Ivey Business School, London, Canada

Managing diversity and creating inclusive workplaces can seem like a daunting challenge for many organisations, but Evelina and Jill have produced a really accessible, highly practical guide to help organisations get going. What we particularly liked was that it was packed full of real examples and illustrations and lots of useful links and tools.

~Tracy Powley, director, Focal Point Training and Consultancy Ltd, United Kingdom

Because inclusion is one of the core values of the USTA, it is important for me to lead, motivate and work well with individuals of diverse backgrounds, capabilities and interests in order to achieve the outcomes we’ve set for ourselves. This book is a great resource for any organization looking to create a successful culture of inclusion.

~D.A. Abrams, chief diversity & inclusion officer, United States Tennis Association/ author, Diversity & Inclusion: The Big Six Formula for Success

This book goes a long way in addressing the systemic discrimination faced by the LGBTQ2 community in the workplace. It tells you what you need to do and gives you the resources to do it. It makes it easy for any workplace to become more inclusive in their hiring, recruitment and retention practices. I highly recommend it for every workplace.

~ Deb Al-Hamza, past president, Pride London Festival/ diversity social worker, Children’s Aid Society of London & Middlesex

I think this book is very comprehensive! There is very valuable information from ‘Foundations for creating an Inclusive Business Environment’ to ‘Best Practices in Diversity.’ I see the value for small to medium businesses that lack a dedicated human resources professional or lack the experience with implementing policies and procedures to promote an inclusive environment; however, larger businesses can also benefit greatly from the examples, detail and strategy offered. I will continue to visit many of the resources offered in the future and have made note of some of the examples.

~Lesley Oliver, diversity & accessibility coordinator, Equity & Human Rights Services, University of Western Ontario

The book is strategic, concrete and to the point. The various examples make it relevant to readers and practical. I also like the fact it is rooted in personal experiences and takes a holistic approach. The book makes one reflect on what is not obvious, helps avoid assumptions and discusses unconscious bias.

~Magali Toussaint, international career and cross-cultural coach/ diversity professional, Netherlands, http://about.me/magali.toussaint

 

 

 

 

Five Easy Actions for a More Inclusive Workplace


Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity at Work  co-author  No-Nonsense Guide to Workplace Inclusion

Workplace inclusion can seem like an elusive goal. Does it really have to be that way? Whether you have a strategy in place, or take small steps with bolder ones along the way—it will pay off! Here are a few ideas, they don’t take a lot of effort and best of all you can start them today!

1. Add a voluntary self-identification check box in your application process.

Who’s applying? Who is not? Self-identification will provide you with vital statistics for human resources planning. Case in point: if you start to see a pattern that only men are applying for a job, barriers could exist for women. This is worth investigating. Organizations are increasingly expected to reflect the communities they serve. Voluntary self-identification is one way of obtaining this information from the front end. Be sure to outline why you are requesting the information and how it will be used.

2. Add a diversity and inclusion section to each of your staff /leadership meetings.

Injecting awareness and instructional information into your workplace on a regular basis is a significant reminder, diversity and inclusion is an integral part of your operations. It is not an add-on but just as crucial as health and safety awareness.

3. Ask your generation Y (Millennials) for their opinion.

Seems strange? Not really! They are dying to hear from you. These workers have had diversity as a natural part of their landscape. They have expertise and want to be acknowledged for their opinions. Find out what they think you could do to make the workplace better and ask them to help out with building a strategy.

4. Thank an employee.

Each week send a handwritten thank you note to an employee recognizing their work. How long does it take? The busiest person on the planet has two minutes to thank an employee. Isn’t a good employee worth the time? Your recognition will go a long way with boosting morale.
5. Inform all staff about professional development and promotional opportunities.

You are probably thinking we do that already so what’s the big deal? Consistently, research points to the fact that visible minorities, women and immigrants are often left out of the loop when it comes to growing and developing in the organization. Workplace equity begins with giving everyone the same information and organizational opportunities.

Motivated to learn more about workplace inclusion? The No-Nonsense Guide to Workplace Inclusion can show you how to do it. Endorsed by business management schools and diversity practitioners, it’s all you really need.  Visit http://www.yourdiversityatwork.com/ebook/  to preview and purchase.

Pride Is Not For Everyone


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Written by:  Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity at Work in London Inc.

Change is often a good thing. When it comes to equal rights for the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered groups, increased awareness and advocacy has contributed to their greater inclusion in the workplace and in our communities at large.

The Pride Parade in London is not the raucous as it is in other cities notably Toronto. Just like everything in London, Ontario it is far more subdued and conservative focusing more on family, friends and allies and less as a spectacular show or tourist attraction.

Pride is about honesty, sexual expression and having a “safe space”. The parade and its other events support this freedom. But Pride is not for everyone, and participating in these events is  a choice. Agencies and businesses alike often exploit this event to advance their strategic or advocacy agendas with little thought into what it represents and who the right people should be to participate.

My business had a booth a few years ago at Pride in London, and I had a number of disturbing observations.

Arriving early in the morning, I began to set up my booth, with employees from various large and multinational corporations, falling closely behind. Setting up their tables and fleeing for the rest of the day, they only came back at the end when everything was over and ready to pack. Merely, leaving brochures and business cards, there was no intention to engage with the crowd. Yet, I surmised that the representatives were from companies who placed hundreds and thousands of dollars in sponsorship but did not have the decency to stick around. That smacks of a phony commitment to LGBT in my books!

And let’s not forget the young man in the booth next to me who was selling phallic-like hats and similar paraphernalia. Every half an hour or so he would reach over to his girlfriend and start kissing her and more. Do you suppose he might have been a little uncomfortable with attending a gay event? With all of the other opportunities one comes across in a day to safely express one’s heterosexuality, was it so necessary to do so in an event that seeks to stamp out heterosexism? I think not. As they say: “Get a room!”

Finally, a New Canadian spoke to me about the service he was getting at a local agency. He was really pleased with how they were trying to get him out of his house and make him more sociable. He recounted how he was “invited to a ceremony” in which “he was part of a parade” and given “a colourful flag”. The event was Pride in London. The man was not gay. He was a married man from the Middle East and a devout Muslim. He had no idea what he was attending. This televised event could bring a lot of grief for him. What would his family say if they see him? What might his reaction be when he finds out what he attended? Inviting clients to attend Pride Events without fully disclosing its meaning is simply: disrespectful, dishonest, irresponsible, culturally and religiously insensitive. Numbers are not everything!

Pride events often take place on weekends and evenings. Just because you don’t want to be a part of the Pride event doesn’t mean you don’t support LGBT rights. You may prefer to have stricter boundaries between your work and personal time. Additionally, if employers provide no  compensation for attending these events to support agency goals through pay or time off, they should not expect employees to take time away from their existing schedules to do one more thing for their job. Lack of participation should not be interpreted as you don’t care about LGBT rights. It could simply mean that you don’t like attending parades or that you really are pressed for time.

After all, when you compare how abysmal the attendance at Women’s Day events is: Do we interpret this as an expression of our Community’s disinterest in women’s rights? I don’t think so. Some people have different ways of showing support and advocacy. That needs to be respected.

Next time you think about having your company be a part of Pride Events, ask yourself if you are sending the best representative. Give employees a way out without judgement. If they go and feel uncomfortable, they may end up staining your corporate image like the guy in the booth who was compelled to display his heterosexuality. Be honest with what the event represents and if you plan to invite New Canadians to participate, you must take extra steps to ensure cultural sensitivity. We need to be mindful that in a good part of the world, openly gay men are still murdered, tortured and imprisoned. Going to a Pride Event may be a big leap that they are not ready to make as of yet.

 

In Praise of Generation Y


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Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity At Work in London Inc.  Author of Diversity and Inclusion On A Budget:  How to have a more engaged and innovative workforce with little or no dollars.

Hey there, Evelina!”, the e-mail salutation reads. Do I know this person? It seems that they must know me, right? Because they are so familiar? Nope. I never met them in my life! Probably a Generation Y’er  I figure, who is sending me this in their casual and unassuming way.

Born during 1981- 2000, Generation Y’s unique characteristics have stirred up a lot of turmoil in the workplace especially when it comes to their Baby Boomer bosses and co-workers. Whether it’s their tattoos, piercings, flip-flops, self-care or their need to be wired, connected and  informed  — the workplace will never be the same. Sorry Boomers! Laden with labels like: “disloyal”, “uncommitted”, “self- serving”, “techno-savvy”, “fun-seeking”, “lazy”, and “immature”; these children of Baby Boomers have  experienced more freedom, less responsibility, little in the way of criticism, and some would argue too much praise.

Consequently, employers complain that they don’t take work seriously, can’t handle criticism and feel they are entitled to privileges and rewards that others do not get and that they do not deserve. The disconnect begins here. After all, how do we get four generations to work together for the first time?

As a Generation X’er, I understand the harsh criticism bestowed upon Generation Y’ers; but at the same time I think that our generation understands them better than the Boomers. Generation X’ers were the first generation to dispel the myth that getting a university education will automatically land you a “good job”. We were working in call centres, as clerks and service jobs with our university degrees when the first recession hit in the 1980’s. But Generation X’ers approach to this phenomenon was a little bit different. Because of fewer jobs, our “latch key” socialization meant that we looked for solutions within ourselves. We decided to make our own jobs, creating the largest generation of entrepreneurs ever.

Generation Y’s solution to the shift in the economy is different. Strategically, Generation Y put their cards on the table right at the beginning with their prospective employers letting them know what they need from them, instead of what they can offer. Taking a completely different approach from previous generations, the Generation Y’er can come across as self-serving. That is where some of the conflict and misunderstanding begins along with many other disconnects in workplace values.

I am not a big fan of theories of generational differences although I believe there are some merits to the observations about various age groups but I don’t think they are absolute. I strongly believe that social class, birth order, and cultural differences play larger roles than age. The research in this area is arguably centred around privileged white youth who live in the suburbs, so it could be unrepresentative.

Despite the criticism lodged against Generation Y’ers, when it comes to diversity they really get it. Parented by those who lived through civil, women, and gay rights movements, Generation Y’ers have had a strong initiation into equality. Attending inclusive schools with children who have disabilities, exposure to more cultural and racial differences as well as a variety of family  compositions: this generation is more socially and environmentally aware. Of all the generations, they will have more of a propensity toward social justice and want to know the impact of their work.

When it comes to helping your organization develop a diversity strategy, ask a Generation Y’er. You can bet that the strongest supporters of diversity and inclusion in your workplace are Generation Y’ers. Not only have they been more exposed to a
rapidly changing diverse world —it is natural to them and they embrace it.

So, before you reprimand your Generation Y’er for not wanting to work overtime hours for free: relax; let your hair down; plug in your iPod and put on a pair of your favourite flip-flops and recognize the positive attributes of this deeply misunderstood  generation.

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