NEW OFFERING!


Virtual Workshop: July 21, 2021

ACTIVE LISTENING SKILLS FOR INCLUSIVE LEADERSHIP

Let others know their voice matters!

Two young businessmen and a young businesswoman looking at camera — Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis

Let others know their voice matters!

  • Do you feel disconnected from your team, staff, or co-workers and don’t know why?
  • Do you find workplace conflicts are frequently getting in the way of team building?
  • Is there a lot of talking going on and not enough empathy in your workplace?
  • Are you seeking a sure-fast way of improving your communication skills?
  • Do diversity dialogues quickly turn to name-calling and judgment?
  • Do the same workplace problems keep on resurfacing?
  • Are you lost for ideas of how to resolve recurring service or staff problems?
  • Have you been told more than once that “you just don’t listen”?

If you have answered “Yes” to any of these? This workshop is for you! Over the last year and a half, I have received an uptake in requests for sensitivity/empathy training. If there is one common denominator to most of my calls, people are not actively listening. They may be hearing, but that’s about it. Staff, employees, co-workers, and clients give us clues about our behavior or how to improve situations, but we choose to ignore them. We may dismiss them or be too distracted to hear what others are saying. We may think we already have “all of the answers,” and our stubbornness or rigidity won’t allow for a difference of opinion. But you can change all of this. For example, I learned about active listening skills many years ago when I was a counselor for an anger management program. They were simple techniques but had a tremendous impact on building and improving relationships. I continue to teach these skills in my anti-bullying and inclusive leadership webinars. Active listening conveys humility and shows respect for others. It’s not rocket science. But, you will be amazed at the results!

Acquiring Active Listening Skills Can:

  • Help you to build stronger connections between your staff, co-workers, and clients.
  • Reduce biases against people and assess situations more clearly.
  • Improve your productivity and reduce misunderstanding.
  • Build your reputation as an empathetic listener and leader.
  • Increase your understanding of people who are different from you.
  • Open up your world to new ideas and ways of looking at a variety of issues.
  • Develop trust among your team members.
  • Improve your customer service.
  • Sharpen your mediation and conflict resolution skills.

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • The differences between passive and active listening;
  • The qualities of an effective listener;
  • Responding, encouraging, and attending behaviours;
  • Tips for being an empathetic and active listener;
  • The benefits of active listening;
  • About the attitudes and beliefs stifling active listening;
  • Verbal and non-verbal ways to communicate attentiveness;
  • The characteristics of active listening.
  • How to orient yourself to listen actively;
  • Various techniques for active listening.

This interactive workshop involves role-playing, reflective exercises, analyzing conversations, a workbook, and a hard copy certificate of completion. 3 hours

To learn more and register visit: https://www.diversityatworkcommunications.com/events/active-listening-skills-for-inclusive-leadership-1

Remember to register at least two days in advance.

Learn how to be a better leader with this upcoming virtual workshop!

May 2021 Webinar Calendar


April 2021 Webinars


The Old Girls’Network: The Politics of Exclusion


Evelina Silveira

President, Diversity at Work Communications Training

Three Smiling Businesswomen

It is rarely discussed, usually only in private circles.  You won’t see it headlining any diversity conferences on women in leadership or bias.  But, the “Old Girls’ Network” is alive and well, functioning as an elitist, exclusionary club of sameness much like its counterpart,  “The Old Boys’ Network.” 

Having worked for over 15 years in predominately female-led organizations before starting my business, I have seen firsthand how these toxic networks operate.  Valuing likeness, adoration, organizational fit over skills rather than innovation and diversity of thought.  The insecure female executive leading the Network prefers the cloak of blandness and familiarity with admiring females who will not challenge her leadership rather than accepting different views or improving the organization.

Does this sound familiar at all?  It has all of the features of systemic discrimination, but it is not politically correct to talk about it.  After all, the traditional narrative is that men hold women back.  In some cases, they do. However, we cannot overlook in far too many female lead organizations, barring other women from professional and social networks is just as discriminatory.  Old Girls’ Networks should not get a pass any more than their male counterparts.

Those who are fortunate to be accepted into the “Old Girls’ Network” can expect specific rewards.

  • promotions you don’t deserve because the boss thinks you are easier to manage than the other employees who are more vocal with their opinions and disagree
  • achievement  awards that are based more on popularity than actual work or progress you have made
  • entry into female executives’ social circle
  • gain social capital among your peers

If you are an “outsider,”  you can expect:

  • to be considered “difficult” or a “problem.”
  • being monitored more closely than others –trying to find a time where you slip up
  • to not be recognized for your achievements or ideas
  • to be passed up for promotions
  • to feel that you are more qualified than your boss
  • to be bullied and harassed by your boss and co-workers
  • to feel demoralized because no matter how well you try to get along with your boss and co-workers, you don’t  feel “included.”
  • your performance appraisals may include comments of a personal nature rather than your professional attributes or skills.

The “Old Girls’ Network”  is not specific to any group of women. I have seen it operate among many racial and ethnic groups. 

The politics of exclusion is rooted in insecurity and fear of losing power.  How strange it is that we speak about empowering women and girls, yet this contradictory, disempowering relic is allowed to go unchallenged?

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Check out our upcoming webinar series:

https://www.diversityatworkcommunications.com/workshopregistration

February/March 2021 Webinar Calendar


Here’s a list of our signature webinars and content you will find no where else. Practical, engaging, with the goal of improving communication and customer service.

If you are interested in attending, please register at least two days in advance. Contact regarding customization or having a training event delivered in your timezone.

https://www.diversityatworkcommunications.com/workshopregistration

Be sure to sign up to receive regular updates about our training opportunities at https://www.diversityatworkcommunications.com/

Webinar Calendar


Check out our line-up of for December 2020 Webinars. If you would like to receive regular updates on our promotional events sign up at our website: http://www.diversityatworkcommunications.com.

Thank you!

Webinar: Understanding and Responding to Intercultural Conflict


July 10 or 16, 2020

With global business communications and diverse workplaces increasing, intercultural conflicts and misunderstandings are bound to happen.
Ethnocentric approaches  mistakenly  assert that all conflicts are pretty much the sameiand should be handled similarly. But, this is ineffective and does not take into consideration the uniqueness of various cultures.
Intercultural conflicts are different. 


Hone your cultural competencies skills and  learn to look at intercultural conflict from a ethnorelative lens.
In this webinar you will:

  • Learn how differences in cultural perceptions can trigger discord.
  •  Theories of intercultural conflict.
  •  Figure out if a conflict is culturally-based.
  •  Gain strategies for dealing with intercultural conflict when it arises.
  •  Understand how different cultures approach and resolve conflicts.   
  • Ways of preventing or minimizing intercultural conflict in the future.
  • Obtain specific questions for mediating intercultural conflicts in the workplace.

This is a condensed version of a one-day workshop.  
If you want to improve the communication skills among your global teams, culturally diverse clients or staff, this is for you!

Learn more and register:

https://www.diversityatworkcommunications.com/webinars

Webinar: Anger Management


July 13 or 18 2020

Keeping your cool at work is not always easy. If you are having problems with controlling your anger at work, you could be missing out on promotional opportunities, productive relationships and could risk having a bullying or harassment complaint laid against you.

Don’t you owe it to yourself and your co-workers to learn some new ways of behaving that are actually good for you?

Learn more and register for the webinar on July 13 here:

https://www.diversityatworkcommunications.com/events/webinar-anger-management-in-the-workplace

Learn more and register for the webinar on July 18 here:

https://www.diversityatworkcommunications.com/events/webinar-anger-management-in-the-workplace-2

Be sure to sign up for our email marketing list at www.diversityatworkcommunications.com

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SERVING CUSTOMERS WITH LANGUAGE BARRIERS OVER THE PHONE


LIVE WEBINAR

June 10 and 12 2020

Here is a customer service training event you will not want to miss! Hone your cultural competency skills and create an excellent customer service experience every time.

NOTE:  The content of this webinar has been originally delivered to over 400 participants  sector-wide across Canada, within a  3-hour workshop time frame.   Approximate length is 1 hours and 30 minutes.

In this interactive,  practically-based webinar you will learn how to: 


· Tell if the caller has a genuine language barrier or merely a heavier accent. 
· Understand and decipher common distorted pronunciation and grammatical patterns with helpful tips and tricks. 
· Speak more clearly. 
· Read numbers and spell using an ESL alphabet. 
· Tell what tense the caller is speaking. 
· Guide the caller to obtaining vital information. 
· Calm distressed callers with three simple words. 
· Deal with common stressors including impolite and uncooperative callers. 
·  Simplify industry terms using clear language

Past participants have included:  9-1-1 call takers, receptionists, intake workers, crisis centre workers, program coordinators, salespeople and police officers.
Supplementary materials are available for purchase:
The 9-1-1  Call Taker Clear Language Guide  
Telephone Training Job Aids

NOTE:  Please be advised that each participant will require a unique password. Pricing is per participant. No sharing of codes is permitted. Participants who enter the webinar room without paying the registration  will be asked to leave.  Your co-operation is appreciated. This webinar is offered at half price. Thank you for supporting a small business during these challenging times.
If you have any questions, please contact   519-659-4777.  evelina@diversityatworkcommunications.com

Learn more and register at https://www.diversityatwork

communications.com/webinars

Contact Diversity at Work to arrange a convenient time for your organization to attend. 519-549-4777.

Tutoring with Cambly: A fun way to increase your cultural competency


Evelina Silveira

It happened one night when I was fully awake, lying in bed and thinking of a fun job I could do at home.  I wanted it to be something that would complement the work I do in my business.  Generally, when I decided to take on part-time or temporary work, I do it to enhance my skills and knowledge for my training business, Diversity at Work.

I “Googled”  teaching English online without an  ESL certificate and came across, Cambly.  I had looked at other sites before and read their reviews, but I was not interested in having a job that would take a lot of preparation or had a pre-determined schedule.  I needed flexibility to  work on my business.

I completed the quick application form and sent them a video. Within about 10 days I was working.

Cambly is an app which helps English as a Second Language Speakers to practice their conversation skills and learn grammar with tutors from around the world. They choose the number of minutes they want to speak each week and the tutor(s) they want to work with.

Most of the students are from Saudi Arabia, Brazil, Japan, China and Taiwan.  The app is picking up popularity and users from other countries are emerging now as well.  Because I specialize in business English with intermediate and advanced speakers, my students tend to be professionals.  When you complete your profile with Cambly you can specify your areas of interest.  Do you want to work with beginners? Advanced speakers?  Do you want to teach listening skills? Grammar? Students will read your profile and determine whether you are the right fight for them.  If you are, they will click on your profile when you are online and choose you for a lesson.

I was a little nervous on my first call as I had not really figured out the app that well, by this time.  I still remember the first call. It was a man sitting on a carpet wearing traditional Gulf-style clothing; the white long chemise and pants along with the red scarf draping his head.  He was sipping coffee that his servants had brought him.

Since then, I have had over 1000 chats. I have met professors, doctors, tons of IT professionals, teachers, students and retirees. Sometimes, students are calling me from their cars, they are walking, in the middle of a family gathering; or they might be drunk getting out of a bar on a Saturday night!  I laugh all of the time with my students. For nervous students, this helps them relax and they re-book with me because I make learning fun.

At first, I thought I would just do a few hours a week in the evening or on the weekend.  But, before I knew it, the time I had used to  devote to unwinding with surfing social media or watching re-runs of  Grey’s Anatomy was now being taken over by working for Cambly.  Why?  Because it is enjoyable and I have extremely intelligent students who I enjoy interacting. My thirst for learning about other cultures, engaging in political/social  discussions combined with my fascination with linguistics, made this the JOB FOR ME!

You see, most of the time it doesn’t feel like work at all.

Is Cambly for you?

· You need to be a native English speaker.

· You must like to talk and meet people.

· You need to be able to make conversation with people of all different language levels.  (They do offer you conversation starters, if you are stuck).

· You must be happy and smiling in all of your interactions with students. Remember, many students are nervous about speaking. They have learned grammar in school but have not had a chance to practice.  A smiling facing and gentle encouragement contributes to them opening up with you.

· A  computer with a high-speed internet connection, camera and microphone are essential.

· You must be punctual for the sessions you sign up. Repeated tardiness could mean you will be penalized for a few days unable to access more teaching opportunities.

. A neat appearance and clean background free from distractions.

· Remember, you are teaching students English.  If your speaking skills are on the sloppy side or your grammar is not the best, this might not be the best job for you.

What I have learned:

· How English is now spoken all across the world and is the dominant language of business.  EVERYONE is learning English.  I have had anyone from a doctor to a clerk at Dunkin’ Donuts use Cambly.

· Having English speaking skills is considered an global asset competing for jobs.

· Multinational companies have opened up EVERYWHERE and locals are often expected to learn English to speak with counterparts in other countries.

· How the quality of public education varies from country to country.  For example, in Saudi Arabia all education is free but the public education in Brazil is considered inferior.

· In the Gulf States, labour and trades are done mostly by migrants from Asia and Africa.  Wages are determined by nationality.  Working with your hands in these countries is considered work for people of lower status.

· Students have unreal expectations when it comes to Canada.

· Most people do not know much about Canada and what they are unaware of our recent political problems.

· Students who consider immigrating usually want to go to Germany, England, Australia, United States or Canada.

· How difficult it is to learn English because it doesn’t make a lot of sense.

· The role of a tutor/teacher is highly valued in other cultures.  Students will often refer to me as “Teacher” or “My Teacher”.  Their appreciation for the new grammar, vocabulary or sound I have helped them make is extremely rewarding.

· I have improved my listening skills.

· I have increased my knowledge of linguistic features of many languages.

· I can decipher the messages communicated by a speaker of any language

· About human rights in different countries; how some disenfranchised groups are struggling to be recognized while other countries care very little about them.

· How countries around the world are struggling with fake news, political corruption, censorship of the media and seemingly unaware of what is often happening in their own countries.

The downside:

· The pay is not the best.  If you are relying on it for main source of income, that will be challenging. You get paid by the number of minutes you speak.  If you are doing it for the same reasons I am, the pay is a bonus.  I would likely do this even if I wasn’t getting paid.

· Sometimes, the platform doesn’t work or there can be a lot of technical difficulties based on poor internet connections in other countries.

· The students taking the free trial can be impolite.  There may be a lot of hangups, or they might stare at you like you’re an oddity.  In three cases I have had to hang up and report students on a trial because they were exhibitionists or crude. But, this doesn’t happen too often.  Three vulgar calls in 1000 is not so bad.

· You may be penalized if you have to cancel the schedule you have signed up for if you do so with less than 12 hours notice.

All, in all, I think Cambly is a fabulous app for people wanting to practice their English conversation skills but also a fine casual or part-time job for those who want to work a few extra hours.

If you want to learn more about Cambly

You can tell them that I referred you and use my code:  https://www.cambly.com/en/tutors?referralCode=eva533

 

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