Advertisements
Advertisements

Your Diverse Customer Training Magazine


Have you noticed that your customer base is changing?

Do you wonder if you are providing equitable service?

Would you like to enhance your customer service training and protocols but don’t know how?

Do you want to create loyalty and an excellent customer service experience every time?

We are pleased to announce the debut of our digital quarterly training magazine,

Your Diverse Customer.

CoverMag.png

Take a peek inside.  Our magazine has a universal focus.  Whether you work in the private, public or non-profit sector there is something for everyone.  Best of all, we have chosen themes which will resonate with readers from across the globe.

Preview_ Your Diverse Customer (1) Here is a PDF version, please note scrolling is not shown here.

Or http://pub.lucidpress.com/yourdiversecustomer/

Your Diverse Customer Magazine is available in a printable format or online.

For more information, contact info@yourdiversityatwork.com

Your Diverse Customer Digital Magazine

4 Issues a Year

C$165.00

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Meetings: A Tool Kit – New Immigrant Workplace Success Series


Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity at Work, London, Canada

meetingpromo

I am pleased to announce the release of my first tool in a series of resources to assist employers develop and retain new immigrant employees.  The  step=by-step exercises and processes will enhance your own coaching skills while empowering employees with vital information in a culturally relevant way.  I am sharing some of my coaching secrets and style which has resulted in many new immigrants enhancing their skills and employers retaining talent.

You can preview the toolkit below.  It is 31 pages in length and offers a 20-minute consultation with each purchase.  Buy it today and, begin having more productive meetings by developing your own and your employee’s  skills.  Feedback has been excellent!

Includes several handouts such as business idioms; checklist for inclusive meetings; coaching pre-assessments, low-risk no-stress ways to participate in meetings and more.

https://diversityatworkinlondon.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/meetingspage1.pdf

https://diversityatworkinlondon.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/secondpage.pdf

Meetings: A Toolkit Ebook

A 31-page toolkit which includes a 20 minute telephone consultation for each book sold.

C$225.00

Serving Customers with Mental Illness


Written by:  Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity at Work

Another stressful day at the bank! My aunt would recount the horrors of a teller suspiciously inspecting her up and down, giggling and chatting with her co-workers about what a bad person she was.  My aunt would then explain to me how the bank no longer liked her since she started making withdrawals from her account and she feared that they would no longer want to accept her as a customer.  Maria would retell the experience in the most convincing manner, explaining to me how the staff stared at her causing the customers who were in line to glare with curiosity and caution.  By the end of the conversation, I was so angered by how they treated my aunt; I decided to call the bank manager and report the teller.  I wanted to ensure that they would never treat her like this or anyone again —after all, she was a loyal and valued customer.

As the years went on, I realized the complaint phone calls that I made for my aunt about rude staff, might have resulted in a lot of decent employees getting reprimanded for actions they had never committed.

My aunt was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder when she was in her 50’s, and then the lightbulb in my head went off.  Perhaps the incidents she disclosed were based on her fears of persecution and that they had never occurred?

lewy-body-dementia-2965713_640-e1515973823994.jpgYears later, I would hear her crying and shaking in fear about how her landlord wanted to evict her. I would try to reassure her that it would never happen.  Her apartment was clean, she was quiet, and she paid her rent on time –the ideal tenant.  However, each month, I would have to reassure her of this, but it did not always work.  She would go to the landlord’s office and directly ask them if they were planning to evict her. They must have eventually figured out that my aunt was not well, and thankfully and remarkably they were always polite to her.

When she got older and was no longer able to live on her own, she moved to a nursing home which she liked.  However, there again, she thought the administrators were going to kick her out on the street, and her room-mate was part of the conspiracy.

Her whole life was built on fear.  Fear of every sort.  Fear every day.

Sometimes, you will encounter people like Maria whether you are a public service employee or a customer service representative.  People suffering from hallucinations will likely be the most difficult to serve. You want to make sure you do not aggravate or trigger their fear.

Regardless of how challenging people with severe mental illnesses can be to serve, it is important to recognize they are also customers with buying power and deserve respect and equitable service. Not only is it the right thing to do, but it is also the law in Ontario.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind when serving customers with severe mental illnesses:

  1.  Although you may be in the position of power in your role, try not to emphasize your authority but instead act more as a helper, assisting them to find the product or service they need.
  2. Establish a rapport with them, by saying their name if you know it.  Give them a simple compliment.
  3. If someone is delusional, don’t try to correct his or her hallucinations.  Avoid taking on the role of the therapist.   You can try calling their name a few times to see if they can refocus on why they need your service.
  4. On occasion, a person with a severe mental illness may make threats.  Be aware they rarely carry them out.
  5. Avoid drawing any unnecessary attention to someone who is acting out or behaving differently.  It is disrespectful to do so and staring or making loud comments to them does not help.

For more information on how to provide courteous customer service to people with mental illnesses, subscribe to our upcoming digital magazine, Your Diverse Customer which will be coming out in Spring 2018.  Our first issue will be devoted to serving customers with mental illnesses.  It will feature interviews, tips and strategies, global trends, resources, case studies and more.

To learn more about Your Diverse Customer and purchasing details, please email me at info@yourdiversityatwork.com with “Your Diverse Customer” in the subject line.

 

9-1-1 Call Taker Simple Language Guide


Saving lives and providing equitable service to the public in crisis, just got easier!

Our 9-1-1 Police Call Taker Simple Language Guide was compiled with the help of three police services and research on call-taking protocols in the United States and Canada.  Learn how to probe about:

  • When
  • Where
  • Who
  • What
  • and Weapons

more simply. People who have low-English proficiency have an difficult time communicating when they are in crisis.  By using these phrases and words, call takers can save time and  obtain the information they need to dispatch an officer quickly.

For more information on pricing and bulk orders, contact info@yourdiversityatwork.com.

promocover

Diversity: Can we laugh, please?


Source: Diversity: Can we laugh, please?

Diversity: Can we laugh, please?


smile-1491429_640

Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity at Work  http://www.yourdiversityatwork.com

If I believe my Twitter feed, I would say that the whole world is against people of my demographic. Diversity has become so serious, scary and divisive that we have forgotten how remarkably funny it can be if we do not think the world is out to offend us.

I want to share with you a few of my experiences because it is time we start seeing some of the humour of diversity misinterpretation and assumptions.

Several years ago, I received a call from a Caribbean man who was asking me if I would be interested in emceeing a black awards night.  I gladly accepted, impressed this was quite an open-minded group to invite me to facilitate the evening.  I wrote down the details, and just before I was about to hang up the phone, I had this strange hunch that came over me. Did I think maybe he did not want me – a white person?  I asked him directly: ” Michael, are you aware that I am not black?”  There was silence for a moment.  Then with an uncomfortable laugh, he responded “No.” I said, “I thought, so.” Does that make a difference now that you know that I am white?  After a momentary pause, he remarked: well, uh, yeah”. He was dumbfounded!  How was he going to tell me that he thought I was black and that is why he called me? Digging his heels, he told me that he thought I had a “black name” and that is why he called me.  I told him that I did not know what he was talking about:  a black name? Did I look black in my picture?  Trying to wheel himself out from the mess, he tried again and said:  “Well, I guess your name is Hispanic sounding!”  I told him: “Listen, I will make this easy for you.  You do not want me to emcee your event because I am white and by the way, I am not Hispanic –but close enough—Portuguese.  I wish you good luck trying to find someone!”

A former co-worker of mine who came out of the closet at work dealt with the homophobic men in the office in a unique way.  When he went into the men’s washroom, he would belt out the lyrics to “Dancing Queen”!

Acting as a cultural mentor for a Chinese new immigrant, I remarked about Canadian informality and pleaded with him to not call me Mrs. Silveira. I explained to him all of the instances when it is appropriate to use titles.  Running into him one day, I asked about his weekend. He said it was not so good and that he had to take his daughter to the hospital.  He noted how impressed he was with the care in a Canadian hospital.  With a mesmerized look on his face, he indicated he had put into action what I had taught him about informal salutations while he was in the hospital.  As he was leaving, he took a look at the doctor’s name tag which read:  “Sandy Brown.” In a great gesture of appreciation, exiting he said: “Thank you, Sandy.” To his dismay and surprise, she replied:  “Dr. Brown”!  I apologized to my dear friend for a significant omission – doctors and titles! Ouch!

All of these new genders are confusing me. I am not sure that I like the images that come to my mind like when I hear the word “gender fluid”. When I hear that expression, it makes me think that you have to go to the pharmacy to buy something to take care of it – maybe in the special paper products section in the store.  May I suggest “gender elasticity” or “gender flexibility” instead?

I have many stories about encounters in Asian food markets. Frequently, the employees that I come across don’t speak English, and therefore there is much room for misinterpretation.  Excited about embarking on a Vietnamese culinary adventure, I headed to the store looking for the best sauce to complement the spring rolls I was planning to make.  I saw a Chinese man who was stocking the shelves and asked him if he could recommend a good sauce for my spring rolls. I said I wanted him to show me the sauce he used. Clearly, he did not understand what I had said.  Before you knew it, we were standing in front of the Heinz ketchup.  I surmised that he likely thought this was the only kind of sauce white people use!

Whether it was one too many coffees or not enough sleep the night before, I had a twitch in my right eye during a workshop I was facilitating. It was distracting and it seemed like I could not control it. Moreover, for whatever reason, each time I looked in the direction of one of the female participants, my twitch became a wink.  Low and behold, after the training session, I went up to speak to some participants that were in her area. She immediately distanced herself and appeared uncomfortable.  The moral of the story: just because someone has a twitch does not mean he or she are flirting with you!

While running a Latin American seniors’ drop-in many years ago, the participants would cheerfully greet me with: ” Como estas, Evelina?”  (How are you, Evelina)  Reciprocally, I would reply “ Yo estoy buena, gracias.” I did this for months, thinking that I was saying:  “I am good, thank you.” A few of the older women would consistently give me strange grimaces.  One day we had two new participants from Colombia attend who decided to test me again and ask me how I was.  I gave them the same response, only this time they started laughing!   I realized that the “good” wholesome feeling I was trying to express, had, in fact, some other less innocent connotation!

After finishing my presentation about living with ADHD, I had a blind man come up to me and say:  “Wow!  I really feel sorry for you, it must be difficult bouncing off the walls all the time!”  I laughed and corrected him that I don’t bounce off walls too often but appreciated his empathy–even though I felt he was the one with the challenges!

It is time to bring the joy and laughter that diversity can bring! Feel free to share your funny incidents below.

 

How I Increased My Portuguese Fluency by Watching a Soap Opera


Source: How I Increased My Portuguese Fluency by Watching a Soap Opera

Finding (and Funding) Your Entrepreneurial Future


Guest Blogger:  Erica Francis

 Leaving active duty service is a major life event and one that many veterans follow with another drastic change: business ownership. If you’re planning on jumping headfirst into the uncertain world of entrepreneurship, start here for advice and resources on overcoming potentially detrimental mental health issues, acquiring funding for your newest endeavor, and which jobs allow for time to heal.

Ease of reentry

 

Reentry into civilian life – or initial adult entry if you’ve been in service since just after high school – isn’t always a smooth transition. 43% of post-9/11 vets say they experienced a traumatic event during combat, 34% of these suffer from PTSD upon discharge.

Veteran’s health issues

According to a 2014 study, 25% of active duty military personnel show evidence of a mental health condition. Aside from PTSD, depression, traumatic brain injury, addiction, and anxiety are all common. Physical injuries, such as missing limbs, also make it difficult to begin again, especially without the support of your unit and commanding officers. The Wounded Warrior Project, a nonprofit founded after the Sept 11 attacks, offers free mental health and wellness services along with career and benefits counseling for veterans seeking a civilian vocation.

Getting started

Veterans are a valuable asset in today’s economy. As a veteran of the Armed Forces, you have skills, discipline, and a level of dedication that most civilians can’t replicate. For this reason, vets are in demand at HR offices across the globe. Your first step toward business ownership is to determine which career you want. (If you need a few years of non-military experience under your belt before you take the plunge, you can find information on veteran-friendly jobs, such as police officer and teacher, here.)

When you are ready, the Small Business Administration is a great place to find help writing a business plan, understanding licensing and permit requirements, and getting your finances in order.  The SBA provides a comprehensive guide for veterans looking to open a small business. Download it for free here.  The SBA offers information specific to women veteran entrepreneurs, too.

 

Steps to starting your own business

You’ve made it through combat, now it’s time to put your perseverance to the test once again by planning, preparing, and managing your small business.

Step 1: Write a business plan

Include a full company analysis, operation plan, info on management and the amount of funding you’ll need to get started.

Step 2: Find training and career counseling

Even if you think you know what you are doing, you’ll want to actively seek training programs to refresh your memory and enhance your knowledge of your chosen industry.

Step 3: Choose your location

Do you want to open shop in an urban office or cut overhead by establishing a home-based business? Some cities don’t allow commercial operations at home without special permission so consult your local city planning office if you have questions.

Step 4: Acquire funding

You need cold, hard cash to buy equipment and pay employees.

 Step 5: Structure your business

Will you be an LLC or a corporation? Many small business owners choose to remain a sole proprietorship. You’ll need to understand the difference.

Step 6: Name your DBA

Pick your “Doing Business As” name to reflect your company’s mission, values, and services. You can always use your own name until you come up with marketing materials.

 

Step 7: Obtain tax ID

Register your business in your state for your tax ID. You will file for workers comp and disability insurance at this time, too.

Step 8: Get Licensed

If you need a permit, make sure it is in place before you take on your first customer.

 Step 9: Know your rights and responsibilities

As an employer, you are in charge of hiring new employees, maintaining employee records, and ensuring a safe workplace. You’ll also need to know when you can refuse service or make changes to your business.

Image credit: Pixabay

 

Author

Erica writes for ReadyJob and thrives on helping young people prepare for the working world. She enjoys creating rich job-oriented lesson plans and other educational resources.

Thank You!


Thank You! Canadian HR Reporter Readers, for choosing Diversity at Work two years in a row as your consultant of choice.  We really appreciate it.
If you haven’t tried us out, now is the time. Visit http://www.yourdiversityatwork.com to learn more.2017ReadersChoice

Offense: The Price Of Diversity?


Evelina Silveira, President Diversity at Work

This past year has been particularly challenging for people like me: media/political junkies, who feverishly skim the international news trying to find the truth in a web of misinformation, lies and fake news.  My Twitter newsfeed supplies me with a variety of political viewpoints on diversity issues.  I take all of it in, recognizing that each point may have some validity.  I am open to different points of view and I welcome them.  I especially love factually- based debates.

Why do I like it when people argue about diversity?  Because it means we are part of a free society.

My husband and most of my friends have not lived in democratic countries.  They lived under communism where dissent could not be expressed.  If you have ever heard firsthand the stories of people who feared to say the wrong thing or going against the grain – you would certainly have a better appreciation for how we in the West have been afforded so many freedoms like free speech.

Increasingly, I see freedom of speech is only allowed if you express a certain opinion.  If for example, you go against a liberal opinion there can be severe consequences.

Let’s be very clear before I go any further.  I am not for hate speech — that is very different and our laws seem adequate in that regard. Disagreeing and hate are not the same.

American and Canadian universities have been host to violent protests where audiences thirsting for a  different point of view were hurt.  Campuses were set on fire and a lot of other nasty stuff happened.  You would think that university campuses would be the bastions of free speech and critical thinking? But, apparently not.  What impact does that have on education if what we must always be concerned with not offending others?

I remember sitting through my anthropology classes in university and hearing students rhyme off a very different version of history than the one I was taught. Disparaging remarks were made about believers of my faith and their historically oppressive role.  The professor did not stop the discussion, nor was that the expectation. (Probably these days that would be different.)  I sat and listened to what the student said and decided I would not oppose the remarks. Because the student exchange was deeply emotional for me, it left an imprint.  Decades later, I was able to understand my fellow student’s opinion and would agree with her in part and glad the professor did not shut down the conversation because she was concerned it “would offend someone”.

One of the ways I like to set myself apart from other practitioners is that I encourage the free flow of discussion about various diversity issues from a number of sources which is reflected in my Twitter and Facebook presence.  It reminds me of when teachers would explain that you should use a number of sources to substantiate your argument and present both sides.  That’s a really honest approach – and one I support.

Unfortunately, I have found that my need to present a diversity of opinions is not always met very well on social media.  And despite having a private business, some Tweeters feel that I should stick to the same predictable perspectives on issues all of the time.  For me, if I only present one side of an argument I am just another agent of propaganda.  I also feel that I am insulting my followers/ readers believing that they are not entitled to other views and can make their own decisions.  Diversity for me also spells diversity of ideas and opinions.

What I do know is that the lines between expressing a different point of view and hate speech are becoming frightfully blurred.  The best way to shut down a dissenting argument is to say it is “hateful” or “offensive”. Calling someone a racist in Western society is one of the worst accusations and is hurled left, right and centre at people who are often expressing a different view which has nothing to do with hate.

Diversity, free speech, and offense go hand in hand.  If we are going to be a welcoming society to a diversity of people, their values, and beliefs we all need to make peace with the fact that at times we will be challenged and that can be very emotional.  We cannot legislate hurt feelings or thoughts so why are we even trying?  We either grow a tougher skin or live in an Orwellian thought-controlled society:  what would you prefer?

 

 

 

 

  • Thank you for the recognition

  • Subscribe to ‘The Inclusion Quarterly’

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Get started with Workplace Inclusion Today!

  • Webinar Understanding Intercultural Communication

  • Soft Skills/Cultural Interpretation Coaching

  • Find us on Facebook

  • Get started today with diversity and workplace inclusion

  • Follow me on Twitter

  • Preview DyNAMC Magazine

    Preview DyNAMC Magazine

%d bloggers like this: