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POTLUCKS AND THE POLITICS OF FOOD IN THE WORKPLACE


Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity at Work   co-author,  The No-Nonsense Guide To Workplace Inclusion

potluck[1]

While splitting the check, B.Y.O.B, potlucks, and eating leftovers from the catered luncheon are routine in a Canadian workplace; by far this experience  is not an international phenomenon. While you may think your welcoming, kind gesture to “break bread” with a New Canadian co-worker is a good idea, don’t be surprised if they have a different interpretation. Food and eating can be a highly political affair. Political? Indeed – political! Let’s take a look at one of our most popular epicurean rituals which has stood the test of time.

Potlucks

Why do we have potlucks in Canadian society? Potlucks offer an inexpensive, easy way to feed large groups of people, while providing an assortment of food the guests may have never sampled. It’s about sharing: food, workload, and preparation.

What are the beliefs that sustain potlucks in Canadian society?

  •  Cooking is a chore and not many people like it and especially when it involves trying to please a number of people whose preferences are unknown.
  • If you want to have a gathering everyone should be “pitching in” financially and effort-wise. Food and entertaining is expensive and it shouldn’t be up to one person to do all of the work.
  • It’s more fun if we all help out and we can share the joy and responsibility.
  • Hospitality doesn’t need to be formal. You can still be hospitable and casual at the same time. Everyone can be a host. It doesn’t take a lot of skill, effort or rules.

How might these beliefs clash with people who are coming from countries which are more hierarchical, formal and collectivist?

In a big way! Although the price of food has increased dramatically, it is still widely accessible and  affordable by comparison to other parts of the world. We don’t have a lot of rituals around eating except for “eating on the run”, “fast food” and “Tim Horton’s”. With a growing acceptance of vegetarian and veganism what we eat these days is less based on social stratification and more inclined to be on preference.

North Americans tend to view food in a “profane” way as the famous sociologist Emile Durkheim would probably conclude. Food is ordinary and nothing special, has no associated rituals or beliefs to preserve its “sacredness”.

This would be in sharp contrast to the many New Canadians who are more likely to view food as “sacred”. They may have grown up learning how to cook with recipes passed down from the generations, or associate foods with symbolism and rich meaning and a wider array of festivals and celebrations. Some foods may be used for medicines or spiritual healing or to bring good luck or fertility. The “sacredness” of food means the act of eating is a“sanctified ritual”. For example, Jews and Muslims will refrain from eating pork products and the meat they eat must conform to “kosher” or “halal” standards. It means that the animals are slaughtered in a religiously prescribed way to enhance the sacredness of the food and thus the sanctity of eating.
Hospitality is a lost art in North America. If you have ever shared a meal for instance with an Afghan, a Portuguese, or an Arab family – the hospitality cannot be compared. You will be treated like royalty and no effort or expense will be spared. The goal is not to make the experience easy for the host, but just the opposite. By contrast, the host wants to show you how much you mean to them by going through lots of trouble and expense. You will not feel obliged to do the dishes nor would they want you to. They want you to relax and have them entertain you. You may actually feel that they have enlisted their whole family to make you feel comfortable. The experience is formal and every action is intentional. Good hosting skills lead to many benefits including: new jobs, connections, elevated status, marriage proposals, a strengthened ability to negotiate, but most of all preserving or enhancing one’s reputation.

Are potlucks a good idea in a North American workplace? It all depends. If you want to celebrate or show appreciation for a job well done you may come across as a cheap manager or employer – an insult to your New Canadian workers. Showing appreciation and respect for employees and especially those from more formalized cultures requires: a demonstration of effort; some expense and conveying their importance in the workplace which is not a bad approach to take with all of your employees. Is it?

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Listen Up! Canadians Have Feelings, Too!


Evelina Silveira, President, Diversity At Work in London

I have been working with New Canadians for many years and as a child of immigrant parents, I grew up with a lot of anti-Canadian sentiments.  Usually my parents’ complaints had to do with the leniency to which Canadian parents treated misbehaving  children or the relative pemissiveness of Canadian society that was a sharp contrast to where they were from.  While they would complain occasionally about Canada , they would always end the conversation about how wonderful  Canada is and how grateful they were to be here.

Now that I am working in a field with many New Canadians, I hear similar statements.  Complaints about the educational system, health care, judicial system and the list goes on.  I have found myself on many occasions sitting back and saying nothing, even though at times I feel offended, or maybe even disappointed.  On the other hand, I have  encountered similar comments, even ethnocentric ones from Canadian born individuals related to immigrants.  For whatever reason, it seems that it is easier to challenge a Canadian co-worker than a New Canadian about stereotypes or ethnocentrism.  Is this truly fair? 

The truth of the matter is that both need to be challenged.  Often times the New Canadian is making these statements out of frustration with the whole acculturation process.  Sometimes everything is so new that they wish it was the same as it was back home, where they understood everything and knew how to navigate everyday life.  Unfortunately, these expressions of frustration can also be expressions of  racism, ethnocentrism and lack of appreciation for life in Canada.   Despite your cultural background, making racist comments about other cultures,  “Canadian bashing”  can result in feelings of hurt and degradation. 

My suggestions to New Canadians who are prone to “Canadian bashing” is to:

1.  Ask Questions – Why are things done this way?  What are the values behind these institutions?  Get to understand the country and its people before you criticize it.

2.   Get involved.  Isolation from mainstream society can make your feel more negative about life here.  There are many things you can do – take a course, do volunteer work, get involved in politics. Conduct research on Canada etc.

3.  Stop and think for a moment.  If you heard Canadians or other groups making comments about your culture the way you do about them, how would you feel?  What would you call it?  Would you report it?

4.  Remember, just because you have not received a reaction or received  a reprimand does not mean that your comments do not have an impact.  Canadians have a tendency at times to be passive aggressive with these types of views by avoiding direct confrontation and instead showing their resentment in other ways. 

In this day in age when so much turmoil is going on in the world., where wars, hunger and intolerance dominant our media, we have so much to be thankful for living in a country that is a haven of peace and sanity in an insane world.  Quit the Canadian bashing and instead look at what the country can offer you and your children. Remember, Canadians have feelings, too!

Would you like to receive a complimentary copy of our ezine, The Inclusion Quarterly?  send us an email at info@yourdiversityatwork.com.

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